Category Archives: Series

Roll Models: Molly Kleinman, Ann Arbor Activist

Today’s “Roll Model” is Molly Kleinman, a standout Summer Games participant (she completed some of the events on her honeymoon!) and a dedicated bike activist. Since returning to transportation cycling earlier this year, she’s already become part of an active bicycle collective, Common Cycle. Read on to learn more about this inspiring project, Ann Arbor’s burgeoning cycling scene and Rocky the Raleigh.

Molly and her bike, Rocky—Photo by Pieter Kleymeer

Describe your bicycling style in 3 words.
Not very fast.

What kind of bike do you ride, and why?
Most of the time I ride Rocky, a 1970 Raleigh Sport ladies bike. I found Rocky at a used bike shop in South Philadelphia in April, and we’ve been very much in love ever since. Three speeds, 40 pounds, original Brooks saddle. Rocky is my commuter/farmers market/around town bike, and he’s perfect for those things because I can sit upright and look around easily and wear skirts and cute shoes if I feel like it. I can’t go very fast on Rocky, but that’s actually a good thing. He helps me to stay calm, wait at red lights, stop for pedestrians, and keep my patience with jerky drivers. I have a wicker basket on the front and a rack on the back, and one day soon I’m going to get some shopper panniers so that I can do a full-sized grocery shop in addition to my regular trips to the farmers market.  I also have a newish Trek 1000 men’s road bike, which is for longer rides.

How long have you been riding? What made you start riding a bike?
I have been riding on and off since I learned to ride a bike at the ripe old age of 8. Growing up, my family used to go for rides along the rail trails and canal paths around eastern Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Riding bikes this way—on easy trails, past trees and rivers—was just a family activity that we always did, and I never thought much about it. I still bring my bike every time I go visit my parents and we usually manage to fit in a ride or two when we’re together.

I didn’t start biking for transportation until I came to Ann Arbor for grad school a few years ago. It just made sense. The town isn’t very big or hilly so I could usually get anywhere I wanted within 10 or 15 minutes by bike. I rode the old purple Giant hybrid that I’d had since I was 12, which means I never worried about it getting stolen. Since then, I’ve experimented with different bikes for getting around town. At one point I had a really cool 1980 Miyata road bike, but it was too small for me and I also hated the feeling of a road bike when I was constantly stopping and starting and trying to keep an eye on traffic, so for awhile I gave up riding altogether. Since finding Rocky in April I have become completely rededicated to biking for transportation, and I’m in the market for a bike that will help me ride at least partway through the winter.

Rocky carries the perfect picnic

Since taking up cycling again, you have become an advocate—you’ve even helped start a bicycle collective! Tell us about Common Cycle.
Common Cycle is a nonprofit organization dedicated to make it easier for people in Ann Arbor to ride their bikes by providing access to tools, education, and workspace. We want to help people learn how to work on their bikes, and to have tools and space available for people to do maintenance and repairs. So far, we don’t have a permanent space and we borrow all our tools, but we’ve already helped a lot of people through our Mobile Repair Stand. We set up shop at the local Artisan’s Market in Kerrytown every Sunday, and provide repairs, tools, and as-needed instruction to anyone who brings us a bike in need of fixing. We haul all our tools and stands and tables on homemade bicycle trailers, and all of the mechanics who help with repairs and instruction are volunteers.

Since we started in April we have fixed over 400 bikes, and a few weeks ago we also taught our first workshop, which went really well. I learned all about how derailleurs work (they seem like magic but they are not!). Eventually we hope to offer regular workshops, including women-only workshops and a build-a-bike program for kids, as well as open shop hours so members can come in and use our tools and work on their bikes and just hang out with other cyclists. We aim to be welcoming to all kinds of bikes and all kinds of riders, and especially to make sure we’re a friendly place for women and kids to come and learn. Right now we are running our first fundraising campaign on Kickstarter in order to buy tools and trailers so we can make the Mobile Repair Stand a permanent fixture in the community, and we would be incredibly grateful if any LGRAB readers offered their support. If you pledge as little as $1 you’ll get a sticker, and the rewards get better the more you give.

Molly repacks a hub as part of the LGRAB Summer Games

What’s the Ann Arbor cycling scene like? Has it changed since you started riding, and if so, how?
There isn’t really one Ann Arbor cycling scene, I don’t think. There are the many college kids riding beat up old Schwinns and rusty mountain bikes. There are the speed freaks with their fancy road bikes who ride fast through the farmland around town. There is a subset of people riding fixies, and a smaller subset of those who play bike polo. There are also a lot of people who ride their bikes for transportation and errands without really thinking about it. Their bikes and gear aren’t the prettiest, but they are functional. And then I think there is a growing group who are into what I think of as LGRAB biking—they bike for transportation, but they like to do it on pretty bikes, and possibly also in pretty outfits. The city itself is slowly improving its cycling infrastructure, but Michigan is still very much a car-centric state (hello, Detroit), so the attitudes of many drivers still have a long way to go.

As far as change, I know that every year it seems like there are more people on the road biking just to get around. Last winter especially I was really impressed with how many people I saw out on their bikes.

What inspires you to keep cycling?
It’s just so much better than not cycling. On days I don’t ride, I am cranky.

Molly rides the Mont Royal greenway during her honeymoon on Montreal – click the pic for the full story

What do you like most about riding your bike?
I love getting exercise just by getting around town, I love how easy it is to stop and chat when I come across a friend or neighbor, and I love the feeling of being on my bike. I can’t think of a not-cheesy way to say it—riding my bike just feels good.

What do you like least about riding your bike?
Jerky drivers, of course.

Do you have a dream bike? And if so, what is it?
I am obsessed with cargo bikes lately, especially cargo trikes. Not any one in particular, though the Bakfiets are beautiful.

What advice would you give to those new to cycling, especially women?
Don’t be afraid to ask lots of questions. If anyone makes you feel dumb for trying to learn more about your bike, that person is a jerk. Also, ride whatever bike you feel best on. If anyone makes you feel bad about the kind of bike you ride, that person is also a jerk. You want a bike that you’re going to be excited to get onto every day, and it really doesn’t matter what kind of bike that is. It’s different for different people. For me, I thought it would be a badass road bike, but it’s actually an old steel behemoth with a ladies frame. If you have a bike that you really don’t feel comfortable on, don’t blame yourself, blame the bike. Try something else. When you love your bike and you feel comfortable on it, you’re going to want to ride.

{Great advice! Thanks, Molly, for taking the time to answer our questions. For more, check out  Common Cycle, the Kickstart fundraising campaign, or Molly’s collection of pictures and stories from the LGRAB Summer Games.}

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Roll Models: Melissa! Queen of the Suburbs

Today’s “Roll Model” is a familiar face here at LGRAB, our friend Melissa. This is a very special profile for me to post, not only because we’ve been friends since 3rd grade, but also because I feel a tiny bit responsible for putting this woman on the road. I gave her a vintage Bridgestone Kabuki (“Smurfette”) and talked endlessly about how much I love riding my bike. Then she started riding to work! She lives in the far suburbs (exurbs) of Chicago, so riding a bike around town is no easy feat.

Melissa and her bicycle

Describe your bicycling style in three words.

Defensive, chill, fun!

How long have you been riding your bike?

I’ve been commuting for about 2 years, off and on. But, you know, I had a bike when I was a kid. Aw, those days when we would just ride nowhere…

Why did you start riding your bike?

I first started when I was going to college. It was down the street and I rode my then-fiance’s bike there. I hadn’t ridden much since then, but I am a runner and I love pushing myself, so I thought that riding a bike would be good on my off-days. I bought a crappy Wal-Mart bike, but it started doing something weird and I didn’t know how to fix it. I freecycled it to someone, but it left me without a bike. Dot had an extra bike, so it was mine for my “19th” birthday.

I used to have this horrible commute on the highway. It was so boring and restricting (especially in the spring and fall) but we moved closer to my work, so the commute wasn’t as bad. I decided to start bike commuting because I wanted to be outside more, especially after reading one of Dot or Trisha’s blog posts – it looked so nice to start your day outside!

Melissa riding in a skirt

How does the bicycle fit into your life?

I love Smurfette. I love her because she is unique and I am unique. I love standing out from the crowd and Smurfette does that for me. In my area, there are mostly mass produced bikes or Lance Armstrong wanna-be bikes. Also, I like that Smurfette isn’t too complicated. I know some bikes have complicated gears or something but Smurfette is simple!

How long is your commute and what is the route like?

My commute is about 6 miles, a good mix of trail and street. I start on the trail, which is good because I can wake up slowly. Then I get on the street. There is a tricky part Where the Sidewalk Ends, with no shoulder and a curve, so it makes it hard for the cars to see me. That is the part that I repeat my little mantra, “I have a right to be here.” On some parts of the route, I am too scared to ride in the street, so I ride on the opposite side of the cars on the empty sidewalk.

How do you manage the clothing situation?

I sweat a lot, so I wear shorts or skorts and a t-shirt for my commute and change into my work clothes. I usually pack what I’m going to wear the next day and store it in my back basket. It’s tricky to pack the night before because I am moody, so I don’t always love an outfit I picked out the night before. Or sometimes the outfit didn’t look as good as I thought it did 11pm the night before. To smell fresh throughout the day, I have a whole bag of toiletries to help!

On the trail

What are people’s (friends, family, co-workers) reactions to you riding your bike?

Well, at first my fiance was against it because he thinks it’s dangerous. I don’t think it helps that I am a klutz in general: I fell down on my first commute this year. But he is starting to come around. He bought a bike and rides with me more. The other day, he proclaimed that he wants to try to ride to places more. I am definitely testing that!

My family is cool with it, too. They know I’m crazy and see this as another crazy endeavor. Funny story, when I was visiting my dad in Colorado, he mentioned that a lot people are all starting to ride their bikes now. He is a big Ford truck man, so I knew he wasn’t saying it in support. But I just said, “Join the revolution, Dad.” An awkward silence followed.

When my coworkers found out that I ride to work, they were really surprised. They think I’m crazy and that’s okay. During Ride Your Bike to Work Week, I sent an email out about it. I actually got a response from someone and we’re going to meet up on our commute soon!

You started a Facebook page to advocate for more bike lanes in your town, Aurora. What are the riding conditions like there and do you think it will improve?

Aurora riding conditions are not for commuting. We are lucky enough to have a bike trail, but that is really for recreation. It doesn’t go anywhere in town. There is one bike lane that lasts about ½ a mile. I still can’t figure out what the purpose of it is. It doesn’t go anywhere and it starts and stops randomly.

I am fairly confident that it will improve. I was interviewed by our local paper and the woman said that the mayor wants to add bike lanes but finds it hard to get support. I am thinking about planning a bike ride for some of us to ride in the streets. Maybe if we annoy the drivers enough, they will want a lane for us.

Aurora Commute Scenery

What do you like best about riding your bike?

There is so much to like, I can’t pick one favorite! I like the physical exertion, I like that I am lessening my global footprint, I like the wind in my hair on a hot day, I like seeing deer on my commute, I like high fiving the trees, whistling while I ride…

What do you like least about riding your bike?

I hate that it’s so dependent on the weather because the weather is so weird here. I also don’t like the lack of support from drivers. They can be such buggers! Lastly, I don’t like that the infrastructure of my town makes it difficult to ride into town.

Describe your dream bicycle outfit and destination.

I like to wear longer dresses that don’t fly up in the wind. I think it’d be cool to ride in New York City. I’d probably get in an accident watching all the other cyclists!

What advice would you give someone new to bicycling, especially women?

You just have to get out there and do it. You’ll figure out what works for you. Also, plan plan plan. You have to plan how you’re going because it sucks getting lost on your bike.

Have fun with it. You aren’t in a race, so don’t hesitate to stop and smell the flowers. For women especially, don’t flip off anyone that honks at you. You don’t know why they’re honking or who they are.

Also, learn how to work on your bike.

Smurfette - Melissa's loyal Bridgestone Kabuki

How did you get so awesome?

This is a silly question, Dottie! But I shall amuse you.

When a strict man and free-spirited woman love each other, they make a strictly free spirited baby. Haha!

I just try my best to be who I am. I have really great friends and family that amuse my whims. They are all really supportive of me and I’m really lucky. I haven’t had a friend who puts down any of my silly attempts to do something different and that’s really great because if they did, they’d be out anyway! Mostly, my fiance is my biggest fan. He’s the one who holds me when I cry and claps when I dance. If it weren’t for him, I’d be a lazy, chain-smoking slob. (Love you, boo. Can’t wait to be your wife.)

Pop quiz: I was with you the only time before adulthood I fell off my bike. What were we doing at the time?

Riding our bikes! Hehe. Honestly, I don’t remember. I remember when you fell but I can’t recall what we were doing. I know that my first memory of when I first fell off my bike, I lost my big toenail. [Editor’s Note: we were selling Girl Scout cookies!]

Melissa and her bicycle

Thanks, Melissa! You’re an inspiration to all – living and riding with class, style, humor and fun. :)

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Roll Models: “Balloon Biker” Jami Krause

Portland gets a lot of attention as a hub for “bike fun,” but that city certainly does not corner the market.

Balloon Biker Jami

Chicago has its fair share of bike fun, thanks to people like our latest Roll Model, Balloon Biker Jami Krause. Read on to learn what inspires her to ride, her advice for new bicyclists and what’s up with the balloons.

How would you describe your bicycling style in three words?

Exuberant, adventurous, utilitarian

How does the bike fit in your daily life?

I use my bike for everything. I commute daily to my day job, go grocery shopping, visit friends, go on trips and socialize.

You have a part-time business, Balloon Biker. Tell us about this!

I do balloon twisting for all kinds of events. Birthday parties, festivals, store openings, restaurant patron appreciation…really anything. I also do deliveries of bouquets or special sculptures. With enough time, I can make anything out of balloons.

Naturally, I can make a balloon bicycle.

If it’s at all feasible to bike to the event, I will do so. I also sometimes do street performance and use my bike for transportation for that.

Given enough time I can make anything from balloons. My website has information on hiring me for events.

Often I’ll attach balloons to my helmet at group rides and it always makes people smile. This past weekend I helped out with the new Kidical Mass ride. It was great to see so many kids enjoying helmet décor.

Has Chicago’s bicycle culture changed since you’ve been around? If so, how?

I’ve only really been riding for 3 year, but things have changed a little bit. I think that The Chainlink is a great resource for finding rides and riding companions. I’ve met some really great people through that and have gone on some amazing rides. My perspective has also changed. I’m a lot more confident and have begun organizing my own rides and events.

Jami’s Sea Creature

What inspires you to keep cycling?

It just makes sense. Within the city it’s usually the best way to get around. I don’t have to worry about parking or about the train and it’s easy to stop and do errands.

I’ve also met some amazing people through biking. If I were to stop cycling it’s like a third of my social circle would be much harder to see.

It’s great to have pedal powered adventures. I’ve gone on several bike camping trips and I love that. I’d really like to do a long distance tour, supporting myself by making balloons along the way.

Jami on her Halloween bike

What advice would you give others, especially women, who are interested in or new to cycling?

Just try it out. Other than a bike, a helmet and a lock, you really don’t need anything special. You don’t need to be in-shape or to have the latest and greatest of anything. I’m a plus-sized woman and have had no problems. If I can do it, really anyone can.

You can start with a visit to the store, or to a friends or to the park. It’s very easy.

As for fashion…it’s really about your own comfort levels. I wear what I’m comfortable in. You can dress nice if that’s what you like to do…or you can wear normal jeans, or office clothes or yoga pants. Heck you can even wear spandex if that’s really what you want to do.

I’d really recommend trying out some group rides. Join The Chainlink and see what is coming up. Think of the rides as a party…sometimes you need to approach people and strike up a conversation. Just like at a party, not everyone is going to be friendly or interesting. This was something that I struggled with at first, but now I see the same people over and over again and really find it a welcoming community.

Thanks so much, Jami!

Jami and I started talking at a stop light on our way to work a few months ago. From there we moved on to email, which resulted in this profile. Isn’t it so much fun to meet people while riding? :)

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Roll Models: Joanna Goddard, Biking Mama-to-Be

Our latest Roll Model is Joanna Goddard, Manhattan blogger extraordinaire. Not only does she maintain her own personal site, Cup of Jo, she also blogs (and writes) for Glamour magazine. Joanna and her husband Alex are expecting their first child–a boy–any day now, and she has continued riding her vintage 3-speed throughout her pregnancy. Read on to learn what plans she has for cycling after baby and what the best thing is about riding a bike.

Joanna on her bike, 33.5 weeks pregnant

Tell us about your cycling history — when did you start? What do you ride? What drew you to cycling?

My family has always been really into bikes. My dad, sister and I biked all the time, and we always took bikes on vacations. I had a blue bike with a banana seat. When I moved to New York City nine years ago, I got a bike, and I LOVE riding here! It makes the big city feel much smaller, and it’s great to feel the wind in my face. So refreshing and invigorating. (Read a story Joanna wrote about her first bike here.)

As a blogger who mostly works from home (I assume), how does cycling fit into your lifestyle?

Yes, I work from home. I’m actually claustrophobic so instead of taking the subway, I ride everywhere, pretty much year round (except for those insanely cold days). I ride to appointments, dinners, parties, errands, etc. (I recently rode to a big meeting in a pencil dress and super high heels, which was a bit of a feat!) My husband and I also take evening rides by the water, and we often take long weekend rides from our West Village apartment up to the lighthouse at the George Washington Bridge. It’s funny because in New York, you see everything on the bike path–teenagers on unicycles, dudes on Penny Farthings, we even recently saw a group of nuns rollerblading in their full habits!

You’ve kept riding throughout your pregnancy. What reactions have you gotten from family/friends/strangers? Have you made plans for riding after baby?

My trusty bike has saved my life during my pregnancy! Walking (i.e., waddling) has been uncomfortable during my seventh and eighth months, but biking feels amazing, since I can sit up straight and feel free and strong. Strangers are incredibly sweet, actually. Bike messengers and guys on the street will often yell out, “Hey, mama!” or “Congratulations!” as I ride by, or they’ll tell other bikers, “Be careful, she’s pregnant!” It’s really sweet — it’s like the pregnancy version of catcalling. :) After the baby arrives, we can take him on the bike with us once he’s a year old and strong enough to sit up in the bike seat. I’m excited to take him on his first ride. We already bought a bike seat in anticipation. :)

What tips would you give other moms-to-be about cycling while pregnant?

Do it! Ask your doctor first, of course, but mine encourages it. Biking feels easier than walking when pregnant, I think, and it’s wonderful, gentle, low-impact exercise. Just remember to wear a helmet, of course, and ride carefully.

How does your style conflict with or contribute to your cycling? Do you have any guidelines you apply to yourself when dressing to go somewhere on your bike?

I pretty much dress like a ten-year-old boy (jeans, sneakers and T-shirts), so my style fits pretty well with biking. But if I’m going to dinner in a dress or skirt, that works, too. The only big fashion guideline: Wear a helmet! I love this one from Bern, and I put reflective tape on it.

Joanna’s Bern “Watts” helmet

What’s the best thing about riding a bike?

Those magical moments that you can’t plan, like right after a rain storm when the sun comes out and you’re biking by the water, and the air is perfect and beautiful and the water is sparkling and you’re just flying along.

Thanks, Joanna! For more of Joanna’s beautiful pictures and inspiring posts, visit A Cup of Jo.

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Roll Models: Lalipourie’s Bicycle Style

I’d like to introduce our newest roll model, Laurie Harris. She studied at cycling mecca UC-Davis, where she earned a degree in design with an emphasis on textiles. Very cool! She now has her own small brand of eco-friendly jewelry, Lalipouri Designs, and blogs about her inspirations, including lots of bicycle beauty. Read on to hear how she first learned to ride a bike in college, the freedom provided by Davis’ cycling infrastructure and the ways bicycling can influence fashion design.

Tell us about your history with cycling. When and why did you start, and how do you use cycling now in your life?

At age 5 my parents got me a two wheeler to graduate from my tricycle. My new bike was cute and it was pink with tassels! I was going to be like all the bigger girls in my neighborhood. So my dad took me to the local university parking lot to have my first try! I was rearing to go! I was going great but for safety (of course) I screamed “Papa! Don’t let go!” Of course he did because I was riding just fine, but I freaked out and ran into a bush. I was traumatized! I cried, I screamed and swore I would NEVER ride a bicycle again.

Continue reading

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Roll Models: Catherine and Her E-Bike

If you hang around here, you’re probably already familiar with the awesome Catherine of The Freckled Diaries. We asked her to share her bicycling story and tell us more about her cool bikes.

Brief introduction:

I’m Catherine, a librarian working on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.  I live in the Old Town section of Alexandria, Virginia–a small city just on the other side of the Potomac from DC.  I own two bikes–one regular and one electric and I’m in the final stages of going totally car-free and I’m excited about it!

Catherine with her Electra Amsterdam

A little about my bike history:

I was big into bike riding as a kid, particularly from ages 10-14, when I pretty much lived on my bike. I had what felt like free reign to the whole universe, but in retrospect, the outer limits of what was allowed was a mile and a half away. It didn’t matter though because my school, after school activities, most of my friends, the YMCA, the library, playgrounds, etc were in this 1.5 mile circle around my house so, for a pre-teen/young teen, that may as well be the whole world. My bike riding came to an abrupt stop at about age 14 when I started high school in a town 10 miles away and I outgrew my pink Schwinn. This being the mid-90s, it was replaced with a mountain bike. I hated that bike. I didn’t like the way I felt riding it, but because I didn’t know any better, I figured it was because I had outgrown bikes. In retrospect, it was the hunched over feeling, the perched too high feeling, the handle brakes (as opposed to coaster brakes which I still prefer) that I hated. I think I rode that thing twice.

A Reintroduction to bikes and the Electra Amsterdam:

Fast forward a double-digit number of years and I find myself living in Old Town. It’s pretty much the perfect city environment for bike riding: streets on a grid, not heavy or fast traffic, everything you need within 2 miles, extensive trail network all over Northern Virginia and DC to get elsewhere. I bought an Electra Amsterdam with the intention of riding it around town for errands, getting myself to the Metro station, etc. I thought maybe I’d take it out on the trail every now and again, but at the time I was heavy and not physically fit and “cyclists,” particularly those out on the trails, seemed like such athletic people that I couldn’t really imagine doing much more than scooting around town.

I quickly learned that I need a better imagination.

The bike commute:

When my bike arrived in March, I immediately fell back in love with the freeing feeling of cycling, and found myself inventing errands to do so I could spend more time on the bike. After a few weeks, I took to the trail to see how far I could make it, and after doing that a few times (by mid April) I realized that I was 3/4 of the way to work and that I really could make a go of bike commuting. After dealing with a broken foot (minor setback), I started bike commuting twice a week in early June.

The commute is about 10 miles each way, and is largely flat but does have a few short but steep hills and one very seriously large and steep hill at the end. (Here’s a video I made of the commute: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jvYI2PYivw8). It’s a great ride: a bit of Old Town streets, then a trail all the way up and across the Potomac, a sidewalk/trail to the Washington Monument, then a straight shot up the National Mall to Capitol Hill. It also takes me past two rugby fields, which I particularly like because there’s frequently a match in the spring and summer evenings. I love rugby and rugby players, so it’s kind of an ideal situation for me :).

Catherine with her e-bike

My e-bike decision:

A combination of the time factor, my fitness level and various logistic concerns made a daily commute not really workable for me. I thought about it more and more and realized that if I got an electric bike, I could bike commute every day and completely replace my car with the combination of the bikes, Metro and Zipcar. By early August, I had my e-bike (an Ecobike Elegance) and began bike commuting every day–most days with the e-bike and some with the Amsterdam. I still consider the Amsterdam my main bike; it’s all I use for everything but the longest of rides, and I frequently take it on Metro to get to/from farther-flung friends’ houses. The e-bike is more the utilitarian commuting beast.  Either way, I haven’t driven my car since September and have its sale in the works.  All in all, the sale of the car will cover the cost of both bikes, and between insurance, gas and maintenance (plus the ability to rent out my parking space), I’ll be saving/earning almost $5000/year (the parking space is worth a pretty penny ’round these parts).

More about the electric bike:

About e-bikes….they introduce a level of complexity into the situation but I’m really a proponent of them. Mine works in two ways–one by “turn the handle, bike goes” (the throttle option) and by pedal assist option–you pedal and the bike “senses” the effort you’re putting in and matches it. Most of the time, I use pedal assist because that’s what comes naturally to me and it doesn’t drain the battery nearly as much. I use the throttle mainly to help starting from a red light (particularly if I’ve forgotten to change gears before stopping!), or every now and again for a little “daredevil” boost of speed.  Most e-bikes work in a variety of different ways (some allow the cyclist to select the percentage of assistance for pedal assist, others are throttle only, some regenerate the battery when coasting/breaking). I know that they’re a little “controversial”, mainly because of the perceived “laziness” factor, but I think that this quote from a recent New York Times article about e-bikes in the US addresses that nicely (and coincidentally comes from my brand):

“Four years ago, we encountered many people saying, ‘Oh wow, we are so lazy, we need motors on our bikes’ ” said Scott Shaw, president of EcoBike USA, an e-bike maker in Southern California. “Now people are understanding and saying, this is more a utilitarian vehicle for commuting and getting outside on two wheels rather than four.”

I think it’s really important to recognize that not everyone is willing or able (physically, or time-wise) to commute, or otherwise travel daily by regular bike. While e-bikes are not as simple or “green” as regular bikes, and don’t provide the same level of exercise, they are far simpler, more sustainable and provide far more exercise than cars and public transportation. I think they’re a great option for that large segment of people who “would cycle to work but….”. I think that the more we embrace (or at least not dismiss) e-bikes, the more we’ll see bikes being thought of and used as transportation rather than “just” recreation.

So that’s it! If anyone’s ever in the DC area and wants some tips on where to go, what to do (or even a personal tour of the Capitol– a little staff perk), drop me a line!

Thanks so much for your inspiring story, Catherine! Visit Catherine at The Freckled Diaries.

Her story contains a common thread that also runs through my and Trisha’s stories: that of abandoning the bicycle in early teenage years, only to rediscover as adults the fun of riding a bike. We are curious to hear who shares this experience. Or has anyone ridden bikes without pause from childhood up through adulthood? If so, what kept you from falling into the societal trap of trading a bike for a license? On the other end of the spectrum, has anyone picked up a bicycle for the first time in adulthood, having never ridden as a kid?

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