Step-through bike frames for tall women

Two years ago, Kara of Knitting Lemonade wrote a guest post for LGRAB, describing her search for a chic bike that would fit her 6 foot frame.  Today, jamonwheels, a reader taller than Kara, asked:

I am finding it impossible to find a step through bike frame comfortably large enough from my large frame. I am 76 inches tall [ed. note: over 6'3], very tall for a woman, with a 36 inch inseam. Help! Are there really no frames for women larger than 19 inches?

I do not know much about taller bikes, so I checked out a few models that came to mind.  The WorkCycles Secret Service and WorkCycles Oma come as large as 24 inches (61 cm).  The WorkCycles Gr8 and WorkCycles Fr8 have a seat tube adjustable for riders up to 6’4.  The Rivendell Betty Foy comes in 24 inches (60 cm).  Note that the Betty Foy no longer is made in the 62 cm size.  The Pashley Princess comes in 22.5 inches (57 cm).  The Velorbis Victoria comes as large as 22 inches (56 cm).

A few brands I checked that do not have step-throughs tall enough for someone over 6 feet: Civia Twin City, Heritage Daisy, Public, Linus.

I’m sure there are other bikes out there.  Please share any and all suggestions in the comments!

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50 thoughts on “Step-through bike frames for tall women

  1. Dom says:

    I find that the dutch market makes bikes for tall women since the population is generally tall.
    The big problem is dutch bikes for short women…American and UK companies make some of the small step throughs, but not the dutch!
    I’m 5’3″ ;)

  2. Anna Carrigan says:

    The Soma Buena Vista Mixtie’s largest size is 58 cm, but it’s a frameset only.

  3. Sarah says:

    jamonwheels, I would recommend try riding any of the bikes you’re considering since models from different manufacturers have different fits and aren’t always comparable across the board with others that say they are the same size.

    Trek’s Allant WSD and Allant 7 WSD come in 20″

  4. Teresa Wagoner says:

    Old raleigh 3 speeds like my dl-1 come in 24 inches, and they’re usually much more affordable.

  5. Teresa Wagoner says:

    Old raleigh 3 speeds like my dl-1 come in 24 inches, and they’re usually much more affordable.

  6. Julie H. says:

    Maybe try a Pilen Lyx step-through (22-inch frame)? My 6’3″ husband occasionally rides mine and tells me it’s pretty comfortable for him.

  7. David P. says:

    The Yves Gomez is a Betty Foy with different paint and decals; it may still be available from Rivendell in some old stock in a 62cm if the Betty Foy isn’t. Only perhaps useful in the short term, but worth mentioning.

  8. David P. says:

    The Yves Gomez is a Betty Foy with different paint and decals; it may still be available from Rivendell in some old stock in a 62cm if the Betty Foy isn’t. Only perhaps useful in the short term, but worth mentioning.

  9. Kerry Zinn says:

    My Gazelle Toer Populair is very tall! 51 and 57 options, I believe.

  10. Kerry Zinn says:

    My Gazelle Toer Populair is very tall! 51 and 57 options, I believe.

  11. jim says:

    Another possibility, albeit a compromise, is the Workcycle Kruisframe. I’m a 6’4″ guy with a 36″ inseam and the 65cm Kruisframe fits me beautifully. First bike that I’ve ever owned that really fits!

    Jim

    • FritsB says:

      The ladies’ version of this frame, shown here:

      Azor kruisframe

      is also available in frame size 65cm (49-57-61-65). Made by Azor and no doubt available through Workcycles outlets. Black only!

      • FritsB says:

        Although if you insist: http://www.flickr.com/photos/fietsjegroningen/6856587625/in/photostream/
        :-) (the factory catalog says black only but they are very flexible as it’s a relatively small company)

        • FritsB says:

          The same frame shape is made by German manufacturer Utopia Velo, again based on an old Dutch concept. Website here: http://www.utopia-fahrrad.de/Fahrrad_Html/Kapitel_Html/80_Kranich_103.html
          Max frame size also 65 cm; see the dimensions diagram on the referred page.
          The Utopia frames are quite a bit lighter than the Azor/Workcycles frames, as they are built up from thin-walled TIG-welded CroMoly tubes; the Azors are made out of hi-ten steel lugged tubes. Utopia’s frames are made in Holland by specialist frame builder Van Raam, Azor’s frames are made in Belgium. The Utopia’s look rather more elegant but at a price; they cost about twice as much as the Azor equivalent. I have no info on availability in the USA.

        • FritsB says:

          The same frame shape is made by German manufacturer Utopia Velo, again based on an old Dutch concept. Website here: http://www.utopia-fahrrad.de/Fahrrad_Html/Kapitel_Html/80_Kranich_103.html
          Max frame size also 65 cm; see the dimensions diagram on the referred page.
          The Utopia frames are quite a bit lighter than the Azor/Workcycles frames, as they are built up from thin-walled TIG-welded CroMoly tubes; the Azors are made out of hi-ten steel lugged tubes. Utopia’s frames are made in Holland by specialist frame builder Van Raam, Azor’s frames are made in Belgium. The Utopia’s look rather more elegant but at a price; they cost about twice as much as the Azor equivalent. I have no info on availability in the USA.

  12. antijen says:

    I ride a Viva Kilo. I’m not sure the actual frame size, but I’m 5’10” and there’s still room to raise the seat and handlebars.

  13. antijen says:

    I ride a Viva Kilo. I’m not sure the actual frame size, but I’m 5’10” and there’s still room to raise the seat and handlebars.

  14. Dennis Hindman says:

    J.C. Lind should be able to get the Vanmoof M2 3 and M2 6 models in a 26″ frame which should fit someone 6′ 3″ tall. Vanmoof is a Dutch bike company. You can get the M2 3 with what the company calls a comfortbar–sweptback handlebar–that is shown with the M2 6 bike.

    http://www.jclindbikes.com/city-bikes

    Some of the interesting features on the bikes are dynamo powered front and rear lights integrated into the frame (difficult to steal) that uses Phillips LED lights which are some of the best engineered bike lights (battery powered tailight on the M2 6), a fully enclosed chain, 7-speed internal gearing, roller brakes for winter weather, and a optional rear carrier that looks smoothly integrated with the bike.

    Their front rack designs do not seem to be well thought out. It looks like the light will be blocked if you put something into the rack.

    Dottie, since you have a Abus chain lock that you use on your Oma bike, check out this Vanmoof company video where at 3:50 minutes into the video the cofounders discuss their cleverly designed M2 5 bike model that has an attached Abus chain that is stored inside the frame:

    http://vanmoof.com/content/8-about-us

    • Dennis Hindman says:

      At 8:50 into the company video, which I provided a link to in my post above, they also talk a little bit about the Phillip lighting that they use on the bikes.

    • Dennis Hindman says:

      Correction: Vanmoof seems to have two bike frame sizes, 26″ and 28″. The website states that the 28″ is suitable for people over 5.74 feet tall and that size bike might only be available in a single speed with a coaster brake. Judging from whats on their website, J.C. Lind may only stock the 26″ size in the models I previously mentioned.

    • Dennis Hindman says:

      Correction: Vanmoof seems to have two bike frame sizes, 26″ and 28″. The website states that the 28″ is suitable for people over 5.74 feet tall and that size bike might only be available in a single speed with a coaster brake. Judging from whats on their website, J.C. Lind may only stock the 26″ size in the models I previously mentioned.

    • Dennis Hindman says:

      I found out some more information about the Vanmoof M2 6 bicycle. It does come in a 28″ frame size equiped with roller-brakes front and rear, plus seven-speed internal gearing. This size bike weighs 40 lbs. Which is mainly due to the internal gearing, dynamo and roller-brakes. So, if you have to lift the bike frequently or travel long distances, then having this type of equipment on a bike may not be ideal. One of the upsides to having a bike equiped this way (standard for most Dutch city bikes) is that it comes closer to the reliability of a car. Compared to the vast majority of bikes sold in the U.S., it takes much less maintenance, which mainly consists of just having to check to see if you have air in the bike tires.

      • LGRAB says:

        Thanks for all the great info, Dennis!

        • Dennis Hindman says:

          The Vanmoof designs piqued my interest when I did a little browsing after I saw your post, Dottie. Its not very often when a sleek bike design comes along that is also practical for using anytime of the day, or weather condition.

          I did underestimate the cleverness of the design on the optional Vanmoof front racks. At the bottom of the racks there is a tube that redirects the light on the bike frame from the back of the rack to the front of it.

      • LGRAB says:

        Thanks for all the great info, Dennis!

  15. FritsB says:

    Another option might be the Paper Bicycle, see http://www.paper-bicycle.com/bicycle-specification.html
    Glowing reviews here: https://cityexile.wordpress.com/2012/11/12/vrrooomm-vrooomm/
    and here: http://lovelybike.blogspot.nl/2012/03/paper-bicycle-cool-and-practical.html

    Personally I would prefer to go with Workcycles Fr8 or Gr8.

  16. Dennis Hindman says:

    The Dutch Gazelle Populair T3, R7T and T8 comes in a 61cm size, which is suitable for people 6′ 1″ to 6′ 4″ tall, according to their website:

    http://www.gazelle.us.com/brands/gazelle-bicycles/originals/tour-populair?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage_gazelle.tpl&product_id=421&category_id=65

    • Dennis Hindman says:

      After looking at a couple of websites for bike stores in the U.S. that carry the Gazelle Tour Populair loop framestyle (step-through), and then looking at the Gazelle website for the Holland market, I have to conclude that this model does not come in a larger size than 57cm for women. The Gazelle website for the U.S. market lists the loop frame with a 61cm and 66cm size but that seems to be only for the frame designed for men.

      The Bloom is the only Gazelle bike model available in the U.S. with a 61cm step-through size:

      http://www.gazelle.us.com/brands/gazelle-bicycles/urban?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage_gazelle.tpl&product_id=207&category_id=50

      Workcycles seems to design their bikes for a unisex market since they sell their bikes for industrial use where either sex would need to ride them.

  17. Dennis Hindman says:

    The Dutch Gazelle Populair T3, R7T and T8 comes in a 61cm size, which is suitable for people 6′ 1″ to 6′ 4″ tall, according to their website:

    http://www.gazelle.us.com/brands/gazelle-bicycles/originals/tour-populair?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage_gazelle.tpl&product_id=421&category_id=65

  18. AKA60643 says:

    I’m 6’1″ w/36″ inseam and I can relate to this problem all too well. Finding anything other than a diamond frame bike in my size is a challenge.

    I’ve been to J.C. Lind and test ridden the Civia Twin City. With the seatpost raised, I found it a very comfortable ride and was able to get the leg extension I needed.

    Raleigh has a new mixte out for 2013. If a nimble road bike style ride is an option for you, you might want to check out the Clubman mixte. Largest available frame is 59 cm. If I get one, I’d be changing the handlebars for a more upright ride – touring style.

    The Betty Foy is a possibility. Soma’s Buena Vista mixte was also suggested to me. Since they sell frame and fork, this would be a custom build.

  19. Dennis Hindman says:

    I also found a couple of step-through bikes made by Batavus for the UK market that are available in a 62 cm size, although It’s not clear whether Batavus is available in the U.S.:

    Diva:

    http://uk.batavus.com/collection/City+bikes/Diva/Diva.aspx

    Stabilo:

    http://uk.batavus.com/collection/City+bikes/Stabilo/Stabilo.aspx

    Batavus also has a 61 cm size in the Staccato Supreme model:

    http://uk.batavus.com/collection/Allround+bikes/Staccato/Staccato+Supreme.aspx

    • Dennis Hindman says:

      The Batavus website for the U.S./Canada market lists only one distributer which does not have Batavus listed as a brand they carry. The website also does not display the bike models. So, I would assume that Batavus no longer has a distributer for the U.S. market.

  20. Dennis Hindman says:

    I also found a couple of step-through bikes made by Batavus for the UK market that are available in a 62 cm size, although It’s not clear whether Batavus is available in the U.S.:

    Diva:

    http://uk.batavus.com/collection/City+bikes/Diva/Diva.aspx

    Stabilo:

    http://uk.batavus.com/collection/City+bikes/Stabilo/Stabilo.aspx

    Batavus also has a 61 cm size in the Staccato Supreme model:

    http://uk.batavus.com/collection/Allround+bikes/Staccato/Staccato+Supreme.aspx

  21. Dennis Hindman says:

    I’ve found some more information after a little curious investigation on my part.

    NYC bike shop Adeline Adeline lists the Workcycle Oma 61 cm for a person up to 6′ 1″ tall. The bike is also a tank like 65 lbs.

    However, there is a Workcycle step-through Gr8 bike model that both Adeline Adeline and Workcycle lists for a person up to 6′ 4″ tall. Workcycle mentions it as a lighter bike than their Oma bike. Unlike the black only Oma, Workcycle states that it is available in 200 colors.

    Gazelle is Holland’s largest bike manufacturer, and so I expected that they would offer a wider range of sizes because of this. I may have been wrong though. Their website lists the Tour Populair Oma in a 61 cm and 66 cm size. The 66 cm size made me wonder if they listed some sizes that are only for the mens bike. Two of their dealers websites only lists the Oma bike up to the 57 cm size. The San Francisco MyDutchBike website lists the sizes available for both the Oma (grandma) and Opa (grandpa) bikes.
    Batavus is also a large Dutch bike manufacturer but the distributer listed on their website for North America no longer mentions the company as a product they handle.

    • Dennis Hindman says:

      I meant to say that the Workcycles Gr8 is a lighter version of the Fr8. The two bikes look identical except that the Fr8 comes equiped with front and rear racks. Workcycles also states the Gr8 adjusts to fit riders up to 195 cm tall and the Fr8 goes a little further to 200 cm. The Fr8 also has a higher load capacity at 250 kg compared to the Gr8 at 200 kg. Perhaps that is due to the option of attaching a child seat between the handlebars and the saddle on the Fr8.

      Here’s the Workcycles website:

      http://www.workcycles.com/home-products/handmade-city-bicycles/workcycles-fr8-universal-frame-as-city-bike

      • FritsB says:

        There is a clear difference between Fr8 and Gr8 in that the Gr8 is 13cm or 5 inches shorter; in other words, its frame is more compact which may make it less suitable for very tall people, although this photo of their “Attila the Hun” who is a rather huge specimen doesn’t indicate any discomfort:

        workcycles-Gr8-groen 1

        As for racks etc., most of them are interchangeable according to the owner’s requirements. See their blog: http://www.bakfiets-en-meer.nl

      • FritsB says:

        There is a clear difference between Fr8 and Gr8 in that the Gr8 is 13cm or 5 inches shorter; in other words, its frame is more compact which may make it less suitable for very tall people, although this photo of their “Attila the Hun” who is a rather huge specimen doesn’t indicate any discomfort:

        workcycles-Gr8-groen 1

        As for racks etc., most of them are interchangeable according to the owner’s requirements. See their blog: http://www.bakfiets-en-meer.nl

    • Dennis Hindman says:

      Dutch bikes can seem overpriced compared to the average price of $600 for bikes in a U.S. bike store. However, they are usually built for storage outside in the weather 24/7 and to withstand rugged use, plus they are much more pratical than almost all U.S. market bikes. That means more spokes per wheel that are also thicker than anything other than tandem bikes for the U.S. market. The Workcycles bikes also have strong stainless steel handlebars and fenders instead of the plastic fenders or aluminum handlebars on most bikes for the U.S. market. This creates a stronger more durable bike, but it costs more to build and makes the bike heavier. The Fr8 and Gr8 also have heavier Chro-mo steel frames which tend to ride smoother than the typical lighter aluminum bike frames that most bikes sold in the U.S. are made from.

      What also sets the bikes apart is that the Workcycle Fr8 and Gr8 have major differences in the design and maximum load for the front and rear racks. The Gr8 rear rack has a lower bar that runs parallel to the top of the rack. This enables you to attach panniers that come with a stabilizing hook (ex. Arkel) which clips onto the lower bar. This could make a big difference when turning while carrying heavy loads. The back rack of the Fr8 is also longer to enable you to carry more oversized loads than the on for the Gr8. The front rack for the Fr8 looks wider and more heavy duty than what is available for the Gr8.

      For modularity and versatility the Gr8 or Fr8 is miles ahead of what is available in a typical bike store in the U.S. The maximum load capacity of the Fr8 is 551 lbs. Which means you are not likely to bend a wheel if you hit a pothole or ride off of the curb. The volume and oversized loads that can be carried on the front or back rack is much greater than what most rack equiped bikes can handle. You could carry an eye-popping amount of grocerys home with this bike and yet its a very stylish looking bike.

      Here’s a nice photo of the Gr8 at Adeline Adeline:

      http://www.adelineadeline.com/bicycles/fr8.html#

    • Dennis Hindman says:

      Dutch bikes can seem overpriced compared to the average price of $600 for bikes in a U.S. bike store. However, they are usually built for storage outside in the weather 24/7 and to withstand rugged use, plus they are much more pratical than almost all U.S. market bikes. That means more spokes per wheel that are also thicker than anything other than tandem bikes for the U.S. market. The Workcycles bikes also have strong stainless steel handlebars and fenders instead of the plastic fenders or aluminum handlebars on most bikes for the U.S. market. This creates a stronger more durable bike, but it costs more to build and makes the bike heavier. The Fr8 and Gr8 also have heavier Chro-mo steel frames which tend to ride smoother than the typical lighter aluminum bike frames that most bikes sold in the U.S. are made from.

      What also sets the bikes apart is that the Workcycle Fr8 and Gr8 have major differences in the design and maximum load for the front and rear racks. The Gr8 rear rack has a lower bar that runs parallel to the top of the rack. This enables you to attach panniers that come with a stabilizing hook (ex. Arkel) which clips onto the lower bar. This could make a big difference when turning while carrying heavy loads. The back rack of the Fr8 is also longer to enable you to carry more oversized loads than the on for the Gr8. The front rack for the Fr8 looks wider and more heavy duty than what is available for the Gr8.

      For modularity and versatility the Gr8 or Fr8 is miles ahead of what is available in a typical bike store in the U.S. The maximum load capacity of the Fr8 is 551 lbs. Which means you are not likely to bend a wheel if you hit a pothole or ride off of the curb. The volume and oversized loads that can be carried on the front or back rack is much greater than what most rack equiped bikes can handle. You could carry an eye-popping amount of grocerys home with this bike and yet its a very stylish looking bike.

      Here’s a nice photo of the Gr8 at Adeline Adeline:

      http://www.adelineadeline.com/bicycles/fr8.html#

  22. kissmyeagle says:

    I am a 6′ tall woman, and I ride a Pilen Special. It is a lovely bike, but to be honest, I would not recommend it to a woman taller than me. With the seat post and handlebars maxed out, it feels like an ok fit. If/when I buy another frame, I would not go smaller than 60cm (Pilens are all one size, 56/58cm depending on how you measure them).

    Achielle (http://www.achielle.be), a Belgian company, does large step through frames, and they are excellent for other reasons too. Lugged frames, elegant front racks, a very seamless look. The Achielle Craighton Pickup Grandma comes in a 61cm size. Good luck with the hunt!

  23. Dennis Hindman says:

    The Rei Novara Transfer One and Gotham mixte bikes are listed with a L/XL frame size for someone up to 6′ 3″. The top end Gotham has a belt drive instead of a chain and a Nuvinci hub that uses rotating, tilting balls that provide smooth quiet non-indexed shifts even when you stop.

  24. Rachelle says:

    The Babboe cargobikes are perfect in use when your lenght is between 1.55 and 2.05. :) Got one aswell and i love it!

  25. philippe says:

    Eh, two years ago I posted this :

    “The Batavus Stabilo and mambo come with a 65 cm frame, Azor (who build frames for Workcycle) has a San Franciso model in 65, and a ladies Kruisframe as well. Most dutch brands sell ladies bike in 61 cms.
    Re “sportier” frames, some German brands have large women frames (60 or 61 cms, not as large as the largest dutch city bikes though) in their lineup. I’m not sure what’s avalaible in the US market, but you can check the Kalkhoff XXL for instance (also marketed under the Raleigh brand on some European countries)”

    That still stands !

    • FritsB says:

      True, although I can’t find the Stabilo in Batavus’ current catalog. Also Azor’s San Francisco is no longer in their 2012 catalog (which is complicated so I may have overlooked it).

    • FritsB says:

      True, although I can’t find the Stabilo in Batavus’ current catalog. Also Azor’s San Francisco is no longer in their 2012 catalog (which is complicated so I may have overlooked it).

  26. Dennis Hindman says:

    I seemed to have overlooked a couple of Gazelle bike models when checking for sizes. Not only does the Bloom step-through comes in a size as large as 61 cm, but also the 8-speed Chamonix Excellent and 7-speed Chamoinix Plus. Both of these aluminum frame bikes weigh about 50 lbs, which is 23% less than the 65 lb Oma steel framed bike by Workcycle. You can see the suggested retail prices for these two models on their U.S. website:

    More details about these two bikes are on the Gazelle website for the UK market. This website mentions that the seating position can be changed by adjustments to the handlebar (tilt), saddle and hand grips. The chain has a automatic tension adjuster for keeping it taught as it wears and the front light is built into the front fender, which like the lights built into the frame of the Vanmoof bikes, makes them less vulnerable to damage or theft. Depending on the model, the taillight is integrated into the rear rack. They both have a lock on the rear wheel which makes it convenient to make a quick stop at a store. Much like a car, they also have front and rear suspensions which smooths out the ride on rough pavement:

    The suspension also enables you to create an even more reliable bike without sacrificing ride smoothness if you get a tire/tube combination that is less puncture prone by adding thorn resistant tubes or thicker tires like the Schwalbe Marathon Plus. It’s the width of the tire and the amount of air that it has inside that creates most of the shock absorption on non-suspension bikes. Putting on thicker tubes takes away some of that room for air in the tire. Schwalbe kept most of that space by making the Marathon Plus tire taller than a typical tire of that width. The much greater stiffness of the Marathon Plus also creates a tire that is much more difficult to take on and off the rim.

    I’ve used both thorn resistant tubes with thin road bike tires and the Marathon Plus tires on my bike. I’ve ridden flat free for six to nine months and upwards of 36 miles total each day to and from work over broken glass on streets and on a bike path through a park that frequently gets thumb tack sized goat head thorns in the summer time. Most of my flats were due to the valve and not a puncture. It’s the overall thickness of the tire/tube combination that makes the biggest difference in making the tubes less vulnerable to punctures and not the brand, width, or type of material that the tire is made of. If a thorn, piece of glass or metal gets stuck in the tire it will eventually work its way through the tire as it keeps getting pounded when it rotates against the pavement when you ride. Ending up being late to work due to a flat is not good, but also getting stuck with a flat at night when its raining or freezing cold is not something to look forward to.

  27. Dennis Hindman says:

    I seemed to have overlooked a couple of Gazelle bike models when checking for sizes. Not only does the Bloom step-through comes in a size as large as 61 cm, but also the 8-speed Chamonix Excellent and 7-speed Chamoinix Plus. Both of these aluminum frame bikes weigh about 50 lbs, which is 23% less than the 65 lb Oma steel framed bike by Workcycle. You can see the suggested retail prices for these two models on their U.S. website:

    More details about these two bikes are on the Gazelle website for the UK market. This website mentions that the seating position can be changed by adjustments to the handlebar (tilt), saddle and hand grips. The chain has a automatic tension adjuster for keeping it taught as it wears and the front light is built into the front fender, which like the lights built into the frame of the Vanmoof bikes, makes them less vulnerable to damage or theft. Depending on the model, the taillight is integrated into the rear rack. They both have a lock on the rear wheel which makes it convenient to make a quick stop at a store. Much like a car, they also have front and rear suspensions which smooths out the ride on rough pavement:

    The suspension also enables you to create an even more reliable bike without sacrificing ride smoothness if you get a tire/tube combination that is less puncture prone by adding thorn resistant tubes or thicker tires like the Schwalbe Marathon Plus. It’s the width of the tire and the amount of air that it has inside that creates most of the shock absorption on non-suspension bikes. Putting on thicker tubes takes away some of that room for air in the tire. Schwalbe kept most of that space by making the Marathon Plus tire taller than a typical tire of that width. The much greater stiffness of the Marathon Plus also creates a tire that is much more difficult to take on and off the rim.

    I’ve used both thorn resistant tubes with thin road bike tires and the Marathon Plus tires on my bike. I’ve ridden flat free for six to nine months and upwards of 36 miles total each day to and from work over broken glass on streets and on a bike path through a park that frequently gets thumb tack sized goat head thorns in the summer time. Most of my flats were due to the valve and not a puncture. It’s the overall thickness of the tire/tube combination that makes the biggest difference in making the tubes less vulnerable to punctures and not the brand, width, or type of material that the tire is made of. If a thorn, piece of glass or metal gets stuck in the tire it will eventually work its way through the tire as it keeps getting pounded when it rotates against the pavement when you ride. Ending up being late to work due to a flat is not good, but also getting stuck with a flat at night when its raining or freezing cold is not something to look forward to.

  28. How about a Pilen at JC Lind? Even the small one was too tall for me and I am 5’5.

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