Gone With the Wind

Biking may make your skirt fly up, but if you want to keep it from becoming literal, here are some tips:

  • Attach an office binder clip to the hem of the skirt to weigh it down—or, if the skirt is long, try clipping the front and back of the hem together to create makeshift culottes.
  • Wear a garter belt on your thigh with a safety pin and then safety pin your skirt to the garter belt from the inside, or purchase a bike garter.
  • If your skirt has a pocket, put a cell phone or keychain in it and shift the pocket to the front while you ride to act as a skirt weight.
  • If the skirt is voluminous enough, tie it tight with a rubber band or hair tie (you’ll have to weigh your modesty against the possibility of wrinkles with this one).

What secrets do you have, readers? Share in the comments!

{ More on wearing a skirt on a bike—and how to wear a long skirt. }

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9 thoughts on “Gone With the Wind

  1. deborah says:

    I’ve been using sock garters from Sock Dreams (http://www.sockdreams.com/products/extra-long-mens-sock-garters:5534). I turn them upside down so the clips face up, then clip them to the bottom of my skirt. Usually works when other methods you mentioned don’t.

  2. delia says:

    I use the binder clip method. It weighs down the skirt and can also make it less billowy if needed.

  3. […] riding with a bag of meth, don’t cross against the Don’t Walk signal in Coon Rapids TN. How to keep your skirt down while you ride; not a problem I normally have. An 83-year old Maine driver seriously injures an 11-year old […]

  4. Sally Guyer says:

    Use a NoMonRo dress clip from Holland – they are brilliant! http://www.nomonro.com/en/home I also use mine on my raincoat to stop the hem riding up when the wind is against me. Sally Guyer, The Cambridge Raincoat Company http://www.cambridgeraincoats.co.uk

    • Sally’s right, my raincoat stops my skirt from flying up while riding. One more tip: in the winter if you are wearing legwarmers, you can tuck the hem into the top of one of them.

      • You have just answered my question. I’m new to bike commuting, just started this summer, and I was wondering if I had to forego skirts during the winter months as I knew my legs would freeze, never even thought about leg warmers!

  5. Heather Polson says:

    As the Fonz would say, “Sit on it!” (That usually works pretty well.)

  6. Jack R says:

    I don’t have a secret, so much as I wear heavier material like denim or knits with some elastic in the fabric. I’ve spent the year wearing skirts for my biking to and from work, though I have to change for the office. (I don’t think my office is
    ready for me to spend the workday in a skirt). My best biking skirts have some weight at the hem and elasticity to the material, both of which make weighting down or clipping unnecessary for me. I have to tuck or clip my other skirts, like the other readers here, so I don’t wear those for riding. My commuting skirts also share their length, about an inch above the knee while standing. On Friday I wore a favorite, my American Living black denim skirt from J C Penny. My 89th & Madison skirt from Fred Meyer and my navy plaid Merona skirt from Target are excellent as well: snug and elastic to protect from gusts but without being so tight I have to worry about tearing the hem when I dismount or set my foot down at stops.

  7. I made myself a garter with some stretchy cotton fabric and a sew-in elastic band. I used to safety-pin my skirts to it, but after I tore one I took the advice of one of the wise ladies at the Women Who Bike Brunches and just started tucking the hem in the garter. I love flouncy, a-line skirts and this method works like a charm. I also second wearing heavy fabrics, or skirts with trims. My wool skirts never fly up, nor does my cotton a-line with the bead trim.

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