A Sorry Excuse for a Bike Route

One of the most popular and vital bike routes from downtown Chicago to neighborhoods on the north side is Lincoln Avenue. I’ve read that 25-40% of the rush hour traffic on Lincoln is people on bikes. I certainly see lots of bicyclists along the way.

One day last week I decided to take this route to work, since I was on a tight schedule and Lincoln Avenue is by far the most direct and quickest route. Perhaps I have been spoiled by my super long and winding but super calm route of side-streets, but I was appalled by the situation on Lincoln Avenue. The cars sped from red light to red light, the huge intersections were like gladiator trials for bicyclists and pedestrians, car doors flung open left and right, buses heaved, and large trucks blocked the bike lanes on every block.

At one point, I was going straight through an intersection with a green light and a driver turned left riiiight in front of me. I looked at him in horror and saw that he was holding a document up in front of his face, reading it. What the what?!? And last Friday, my husband was side-swiped by a driver who veered into the bike lane. His pannier bore the brunt of the impact (with a big mark to show for it) and he was able to keep his bike upright. The driver had the decency to stop, apologize, and ask if he was alright, but maybe drivers could LOOK FIRST?? Pretty simple.

I don't *think* I'm invisible

Greg is definitely visible

All this on a popular marked bike route, which is a joke (on us bicyclists). Despite the fact that people on bikes make up a substantial amount of the traffic, all we get is a strip of paint dangerously close to parked cars and some sharrows.

Door zone

Our beautiful bike lanes

If Chicago is going to be anything near a world-class bicycling city, this key route from the northside to downtown must be improved. While a buffered or protected bike lane would be the bees freakin’ knees, I know that will not happen. I would be content with colored bike lanes that extend through intersections, bike boxes at stop lights, fewer potholes, red light cameras, enforcement of cars parked in bike lanes, and attention-getting signage*. Such improvements should not be an afterthought. If a street is not safely servicing up to 40% of its daily users, the street is a failure.

Until then, I’ll be on the side streets, getting to work 15 minutes later but in a much better mood. And here, hoping that loud complaints will somehow beget real change.

*Something like, ARE YOU SURE YOU WANT TO FLING OPEN YOUR CAR DOOR WHEN YOU HAVE NOT LOOKED TO SEE IF THAT ACTION WILL KILL ANYONE??????? I’m just brainstorming here, but you get the idea.

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58 thoughts on “A Sorry Excuse for a Bike Route

  1. BanTshirts says:

    Drivers seem to forget that they have the luxury of being surrounded by a layer of protective metal. Cyclists have to make do with their skin. And they should remember that a bike is not just a bike, there is a person sitting on it too. Since most cars only carry one person, car drivers should remember that they are the ones hogging the road.

  2. cycler says:

    Yikes- Glad to hear Greg is OK.
    I think that when you ride a route like that every day you build up some tolerance, but when you find a calmer way, it’s sure hard to “go back”. That feeling of “Yikes, is this really how bad it is?” is a good reminder to those of us who’ve been doing it for a while of how hard it is to make the leap into starting to bicycle for transportation. I agree 100% that we’ve got to make it easier if we’re really going to get more people on bikes.

  3. cycler says:

    Yikes- Glad to hear Greg is OK.
    I think that when you ride a route like that every day you build up some tolerance, but when you find a calmer way, it’s sure hard to “go back”. That feeling of “Yikes, is this really how bad it is?” is a good reminder to those of us who’ve been doing it for a while of how hard it is to make the leap into starting to bicycle for transportation. I agree 100% that we’ve got to make it easier if we’re really going to get more people on bikes.

  4. Zweiradler says:

    Nice post. I like your brainstorming.

    Nico

  5. Zweiradler says:

    Nice post. I like your brainstorming.

    Nico

  6. Lauren Taylor says:

    this is why i hate biking in traffic! it is scary how many drivers simply don’t pay attention to what they are doing :(

    the last time i rode my bike – last week – i had a driver cut me off in the bike lane because he was trying to pass someone who was turning left. i slammed on my breaks, ran into the curb, blew my first tire :'( and broke a spoke on the back wheel. MEH. i mean, i’m glad he didn’t actually hit me, but still!

    my biggest beef with the bike lanes are that the ones here just kind of merge into regular traffic lanes with no warning. half the time, drivers won’t let you merge over & you end up running into the curb… so ones has to merge early, which gets a lot of honks & yelling that we should ~stay in the bike lane~.

  7. misskaz says:

    Yep, Lincoln, all the way from West Rogers Park to downtown, is my daily commute. The condition of the bike lanes/sides of the street is just terrible.

    I have to admit to getting kinda annoyed by cyclists that use the 6-way intersections to go halfway through the intersection while the light is red, because they rarely get through any faster than me. Plus it always seems to be the slow riders that I then have to pass over and over again.

    But the cars are an actual hazard, not just an annoyance. There are stretches where the bike lane striping is completely gone, and the potholes are terrifying.

    Still better than taking the El.

  8. Ridonrides says:

    i’m spoiled by the usual route as well which has a bike lane, little car traffic, and only one bus route. so anytime i’m using the congested Lakefront Trail (warm weather anyways) or going downtown, it’s a complete nightmare! i’m also appalled at streets that are supposedly “bike-friendly”, but are crazily potholed like Taylor St and Illinois.

  9. Ridonrides says:

    i’m spoiled by the usual route as well which has a bike lane, little car traffic, and only one bus route. so anytime i’m using the congested Lakefront Trail (warm weather anyways) or going downtown, it’s a complete nightmare! i’m also appalled at streets that are supposedly “bike-friendly”, but are crazily potholed like Taylor St and Illinois.

  10. Christopher says:

    It is pretty bad south of Fullerton with all the bars and cabs. The bike lane has been torn up between Dickens and Armitage for the 2 years I’ve been commuting. I have found when I ride on Lincoln/Wells that it’s safest to go slow, no need to get anywhere fast. Trying to go fast is just asking for a dooring or to get sideswiped.

    However it is still a hell of a lot safer than Clark with the maniac drivers acting like it’s a racetrack and the stacked up buses trying to run you off the road.

    The last block of Lincoln towards Wells is bad too, you have to take the lane there and wait in line for the turn, not try to squeeze by the cars. (I see bikers try that all the time and almost get hit when it turns green because there is no room, just take the lane like a vehicle)

  11. Donnarino says:

    I guess Chicago is not that different from Toronto after all. Our roads and bike lanes are in terrible shape.

  12. Jennifer says:

    Thank you for this. I DESPISE biking Lincoln Avenue. I find it more stressful than driving. I commute from Ravenswood Manor to the West Loop, and the two fastest routes for me are Lincoln or Elston. Like you, most days I opt for a longer, winding route that keeps me on side streets, but sometimes I need to get to work in a hurry. For me, Elston wins hands down, but everyone I talk to seems to think I’m insane for my preference. I seriously thought I was the only one who avoids Lincoln at all costs. Even the implementation of just ONE of your suggestions would be a major improvement.

  13. RobW says:

    Wow, glad Mr. Dottie is ok! I wish I knew what would break that sense of ‘entitlement’ most drivers have that makes them think they dont have to follow traffic law precisely. Bike Lane parking should just be done away with, or put the cars to the traffic side of the bike lane, and elevate the bike lane to sidewalk height, or near it, with decidedly hard cubs to prevent cars from pulling into it. Driving while reading should be a mandatory 6 week suspension on the spot! At least if they are walking while reading its only themselves they are endangering. 6 weeks too severe? ok, six continuous hours of “drivers ed accident films”

  14. Dave says:

    Apparently in the Netherlands, if you’re taking your drivers’ test, and you park the car and open the door without looking over your shoulder to make sure there is nobody you’re going to hit with the door, you get docked on your test.

    Most of the main arterial streets in Portland have no accommodation for bicycles at all, or they will have a bike lane for like 5 blocks, which then just ends and drops you into traffic. In a sense, that was good, as I never really felt any desire to try riding on them, and so I got used to taking side streets from the beginning (though I firmly believe that all streets should be rideable by the majority of the population). It’s not that bad of a situation in Portland though, as most of the city is on a pretty strict grid layout, so there are almost always parallel streets to the arterials, you just usually can’t go as fast on them, which is ok too. Sometimes it ends up being faster to avoid the arterials, as they are the only streets which get traffic backup.

    I think people really don’t understand what it’s like to have to both pay attention to avoiding cars which are moving up to 20mph faster than you, and also trying to avoid pot-holes and car doors and crap people threw out of their car into the bike lanes or whatever. Or maybe they do, and that’s why they’re in a car instead.

  15. Dave says:

    Apparently in the Netherlands, if you’re taking your drivers’ test, and you park the car and open the door without looking over your shoulder to make sure there is nobody you’re going to hit with the door, you get docked on your test.

    Most of the main arterial streets in Portland have no accommodation for bicycles at all, or they will have a bike lane for like 5 blocks, which then just ends and drops you into traffic. In a sense, that was good, as I never really felt any desire to try riding on them, and so I got used to taking side streets from the beginning (though I firmly believe that all streets should be rideable by the majority of the population). It’s not that bad of a situation in Portland though, as most of the city is on a pretty strict grid layout, so there are almost always parallel streets to the arterials, you just usually can’t go as fast on them, which is ok too. Sometimes it ends up being faster to avoid the arterials, as they are the only streets which get traffic backup.

    I think people really don’t understand what it’s like to have to both pay attention to avoiding cars which are moving up to 20mph faster than you, and also trying to avoid pot-holes and car doors and crap people threw out of their car into the bike lanes or whatever. Or maybe they do, and that’s why they’re in a car instead.

  16. elisa m says:

    All of the bike lanes here are in the door zone, so I feel like I am always on edge. I guess it is better than nothing; at least the lanes acknowledge us.
    Left turn assholes are the worst. Well, them and right turn assholes.

  17. Theresa says:

    Nice post! While I do take Lincoln as my route downtown. I do get annoyed with the potholes and the speedy cyclists who think they’re on a velodrome and not a street. I came in on Monday with an annoyance from my commute. Your inspiring me to try out different routes…

  18. Montrealize says:

    “While a buffered or protected bike lane would be the bees freakin’ knees, I know that will not happen.”

    Well, it will certainly not happen if people do not ask for it.

    • LGRAB says:

      All the street parking would have to be removed to fit a protected bike lane. That will not happen for many reasons, including the fact that Chicago entered into a ridiculous 99 year lease, giving control and profit of all its metered street parking to a private company. So no matter how much I ask, it simply won’t happen, at least not ever in the forseeable future.

  19. Michael says:

    It may be difficult to add a cycle track to Lincoln Avenue (not that I’m from Chicago or are familiar with Lincoln Ave), but there may be alternative cycle track corridors that would serve the same users. There may be other alternatives too, like narrowing lanes to add a small bike lane buffer strip. You guys have a great new DOT director that should be listening for complaints of inadequate bicycle facilities, so this is a start! Is there a bicycle plan that identifies this corridor, either as “adequate” or proposed for future expansion?

  20. Michael says:

    It may be difficult to add a cycle track to Lincoln Avenue (not that I’m from Chicago or are familiar with Lincoln Ave), but there may be alternative cycle track corridors that would serve the same users. There may be other alternatives too, like narrowing lanes to add a small bike lane buffer strip. You guys have a great new DOT director that should be listening for complaints of inadequate bicycle facilities, so this is a start! Is there a bicycle plan that identifies this corridor, either as “adequate” or proposed for future expansion?

  21. Ladyenoki says:

    Angry lol so angry

    If your mayor is actively building protected bike paths, why don’t you bring this road issue to him so they can get started on it? Maybe the cyclists of Chicago can pitch in some money to run an ad on tv during prime time or get the news involved so they inform people to stop doing these habits. It may work it may not but tv is great for stealthily informing the masses.

  22. Ladyenoki says:

    Angry lol so angry

    If your mayor is actively building protected bike paths, why don’t you bring this road issue to him so they can get started on it? Maybe the cyclists of Chicago can pitch in some money to run an ad on tv during prime time or get the news involved so they inform people to stop doing these habits. It may work it may not but tv is great for stealthily informing the masses.

  23. Ash L says:

    Oh no Dottie. I’m not used to reading you so worked up. You’re normally our beacon of placidity in a tumultuous sea of nattering nabobs of negativism.

    Rico got hit this morning by a left turning vehicle in the loop and all of the recent pedestrian studies released are clear that the most dangerous place to be on a bike or on foot is right where you belong while safely crossing an intersection. It’s so scary to think you can do every right and still get creamed.

  24. anniebikes says:

    I’m sorry you have a bad day and a narrow brush with that car. It seems like we all have these days and further confirms why we choose our quiet routes to work. Take deep breath.

  25. anniebikes says:

    I’m so sorry you had that brush with the turning car. Try as we might to be in the correct position in traffic, sometimes the safest route is the quiet one.

  26. anniebikes says:

    I’m so sorry you had that brush with the turning car. Try as we might to be in the correct position in traffic, sometimes the safest route is the quiet one.

  27. Julie says:

    Ugh, Lincoln Avenue. So depressing because when you use “Bike There” on Google Maps, it seems like such a good idea to take it. One of the scariest moments I’ve had riding in the city these past two years was turning left at Lincoln and School going south — I checked for cars coming up behind, saw I was clear and signaled, then merged into the car lane, and right before I turned onto School, a dude in a car caught up behind me and started honking like crazy. Seriously, dude. I know you are late to your date with a traffic jam on Belmont, but can you wait TWO SECONDS for me to turn?!

  28. Elise says:

    When I moved to Chicago, I got a bike map of the city, which marks some of the busiest roads as cycle friendly (Clark, Sheridan, Lincoln, Damen). Why? These are dangerous streets and there are far better, quieter streets (perhaps with a few more stop signs) that we could designate as bike routes. Just because there’s a bike lane doesn’t mean the road is safe. Sometimes I feel more trapped in a bike lane because you are forced to ride so close to the parked cars. I consider many of these designated bike routes to be traps.

    • Steven Vance says:

      The Chicago Bike Map would never mark something as “cycle friendly.” It wouldn’t ever claim to be that subjective or open to misinterpretation. It marks the presence or non-presence of 3 things: bike lanes, marked-shared lanes, and off-street trails.

      The Chicagoland Bicycle Map, produced by Active Transportation Alliance, does use subjective ratings as observed by cyclists.

      “Just because there’s a bike lane doesn’t mean the road is safe.” I agree – theoretically it is there to alert every road user to expect bicyclists, and to demarcate a space where only bicyclists are allowed. But road users, regardless of their mode, should expect bicyclists on every road where it is legal for them to bike.

  29. Jenna says:

    Our fellow bicyclists are to blame, too. I got into an accident with a bicyclist going the wrong way down a one way protected bike lane.

    Hope Greg is ok.

  30. Jenna says:

    Our fellow bicyclists are to blame, too. I got into an accident with a bicyclist going the wrong way down a one way protected bike lane.

    Hope Greg is ok.

  31. venksesh says:

    I had the same experience on milwaukee riding home. I’ve been riding an alternate route all summer. It was absolute miserable and stressful. Got into an argument with another cyclist, yelled at by a driver, and watched everyone pass me as I waited patiently at the reds on Milwaukee. Not sure if much can be done.

  32. ryan says:

    My sister lives in Chicago near the Green Mill (don’t quite know the neighborhood, but do know the club) and I took my bike up there this past summer just to ride around instead of driving. I was appalled at what Chicago thinks is a bike lane. Quit trying to gain political points by painting some lines on the streets and make a real change that would be actually safe for bicyclists. I got doored up there too. I thought Clark St. and Lawrence Ave were absolutely terrible for biking and I believe that they were bike routes too.

  33. Marcusn says:

    Thanks for bringing it up!

    I occasionally ride to the loop from here in Lake Bluff, and I have to say, over those 34 miles…
    Um, er, Granville??? While it’s a designated bike route (east to west — to connect west with the LSD path), it’s absolutely horrendous, and life-threateningly pot-holed in places.

  34. Steven Vance says:

    I’m glad that you paused normal LGRAB programming to describe in this unwashed tone your experience of crappy bike lanes in Chicago.

    I think many readers feel this way often, and expressing how they feel in simple and livid terms is a good thing. But then we must immediately make the resolve to do something about it.

  35. drew says:

    I ride in every day from Oak Park on Washington/Warren. Although the street is nice and wide for the most part, a lot of hazard lies in keeping an eye on the road for glass, while simultaneously scanning for for doors, left turners, right turners, etc. But lately I have started encountering more and more riders going against traffic–and I don’t mean kids, but adults on both commuter bikes and fixies. Given that there are wide streets with marked bike lanes one block apart going both east and west on the West Side, this is inexcusable. With rush hour traffic, avoiding head-on collisions is very difficult, especially when you’re trying to keep an eye on the doors and the glass on the street.

  36. drew says:

    I ride in every day from Oak Park on Washington/Warren. Although the street is nice and wide for the most part, a lot of hazard lies in keeping an eye on the road for glass, while simultaneously scanning for for doors, left turners, right turners, etc. But lately I have started encountering more and more riders going against traffic–and I don’t mean kids, but adults on both commuter bikes and fixies. Given that there are wide streets with marked bike lanes one block apart going both east and west on the West Side, this is inexcusable. With rush hour traffic, avoiding head-on collisions is very difficult, especially when you’re trying to keep an eye on the doors and the glass on the street.

  37. Stephen says:

    It’s easy to put the onus on drivers to remember to look back if a bicyclist is coming in an adjacent bike lane (and they certainly should look back), but the problem is essentially poor design instead of a simple failure of consideration. Public Works staff should design and maintain a door zone when striping a bike lane next to parallel parking areas. That would make the bike lane safer. They should certainly also maintain the pavement surface and keep it swept of debris and snow.

    Before anyone jumps on me, it’s the same in my opinion as blaming obesity on the failures of those prone to it to simply stop eating so much, or choose more healthy foods. Many people are obese mostly because we don’t design in ways to do simple exercise (e.g., making stairs gruesome and out of the way, elevating parking convenience over pedestrian access), and we make unhealthy foods and portions the only cheap alternatives for many people. Blaming poor health on poor choices is certainly fair in many circumstances, but often it’s simple design driven by a lack of regulation and an over-emphasis on economic competition.

  38. Monica says:

    I must confess to being one of “those drivers” (gulp) who tends to open a car door without a backward glance. It’s something I’ve become much more aware of since a workmate of mine had a terrible accident when he hit a suddenly-opened car door – he hit the door and flew over both the bike and the door, and the top corner of the door cut him from his collarbone right across his chest down toward his waist. I was horrified and shocked at the time at how serious his injury was, and when we parted ways due to change of jobs he still hadn’t started riding again (this was about 15 years ago).

    Ever since then I’ve been much more aware of cyclists, though becoming both a motorcyclist and bicyclist later on, I’m even more aware now. I think awareness and signage would help, and yes, door zones too.

    Door zones and on-road bike lanes are perpahs not a big thing in Australia – to be honest I’d never even heard of a “door zone” until recently when I started reading bike blogs! It’d be great to see funding go toward both education and better lanes. Good luck with your riding, and stay safe!

  39. Mr. Dottie says:

    The pannier took a hit, but it still ticking.

  40. AMD says:

    In the East, many of the bike routes are designated by the state DOT, so they can only designate state roads. While it is a nominally continuous numbered route, I find some of them are more congested and have more hostile drivers than local roads, or occasionally other state roads. In this case, bicyclists need more route information, not restricted to specific agencies.

    Elissa M wrote

    All of the bike lanes here are in the door zone, so I feel like I am always on edge. I guess it is better than nothing; at least the lanes acknowledge us.

    I’ve heard this from a number of bike advocates, but especially in congested urban areas this doesn’t really fit my experience. I’ll admit I am far more scared of door zones than of traffic since someone I know was doored and pushed in front of a bus. (driver was getting into his car and waved bicyclist on; the bicycist was not killed, “merely” lost a leg).

    In urban riding (Boston, Baltimore, Philadelphia) I find there is enough turning traffic and frequent intersections that almost all of the bike lanes I’ve seen (i.e. door zones) are not safe if I ride faster than walking speed, while the congestion slows cars to close to bicycle speed. I had few problems before bike lanes.

    From conversation with different planners designing bike lanes, they prefer the door zone standard to sharrows – with these bike lanes planners and motorists are far more aggressive trying to restrict bicyclists to door zones in streets with bike lanes. I find motorists and planners are very vocal rejecting bicyclists right to leave any bike lane (to turn left, if bike lane has parked cars, …) and reject bicyclists questions about design (door zone, right of RTOL, too narrow for stencil, …)

    In my experience, that bike lanes are worse than nothing, since the planners aren’t bicyclists and they are fundamentally trying to get bicyclists out of motorists way (for the bicyclists own good). They don’t see why a motorists should stop behind a bicyclist waiting at a red light (real discussion), and their designs encourage motorist hostility to bicyclists.

    I am curious – are you convinced the bike lane is better than nothing, and if so how? If the Chicago lanes are in the door zone, are Chicago motorists or police different than those in Philadelphia or Baltimore?

  41. yeah, that’s my daily route, three miles on Lincoln Ave. — I’ve seen too many people hit on my commute and had too many close calls myself. I had no idea there were that many bikers on Lincoln, it just doesn’t make sense to fix the situation.

  42. Karen says:

    As one of the 50 most influential cycling blogs perhaps his honor will take you up on your offer to pedal the city with you. Good luck and keep greasing the wheel.

  43. E A says:

    Lincoln is my usual route… amen to demands for better conditions for our bike lanes!

  44. Greg Foster-Rice says:

    I certainly agree that Lincoln could be much improved, but it’s actually now my preferred route over the lakefront path for commuting. I’ve had more near misses and minor collisions on the lakefront path with joggers, peds, dog walkers, rollerbladers and — worst of all — lycra speed jockeys, than I ever have on Lincoln. So I think a huge part of the problem is the need for an educational campaign about how to bike safely and how other street-users can accommodate cyclists, whether on the lakefront path or the roads.

    That said, it would be great if Lincoln were converted into something like the new Kinzie corridor. If I am not mistaken, that would preserve parking meters while providing a safer place for cyclists. At the opening of the Kinzie corridor a few weeks ago there was a press conference and the DOT guys said they were planning on adding 25 miles/year of those protected lanes every year for the next 4 years. I’m hopeful it could really happen — there’s certainly more cycle commuters the past few years than ever before. And I’d LOVE for people to campaign for Lincoln as one of those routes.

    Lastly, if people don’t take Lincoln but are going from up north into downtown, how do they go? I’d love to try some alternates to at least switch up my view…and maybe make for a safer ride.

    • LGRAB says:

      An alternate route from the north to downtown is Southport to Armitage to Wells. After Southport you have to jog east on Webster and south on Racine a bit to get to Armitage, but otherwise it’s a pretty simple route. Those three main streets all have regular striped bike lanes and are much calmer than Lincoln, although there is a lot of traffic.

      There is another, much quieter route I take with almost no traffic but there are a lot of twists and turns, I couldn’t even say which streets I take, except that I start on Greenview. I used Google Maps to find possible side streets and then spent several days of trial and error to determine the best route for me.

      • Greg Foster-Rice says:

        Dottie and LGRAB rock! Thanks for the suggestion. I took Southport to Webster to Armitage to Wells today and it provided a very nice alternative. As you said, still busy, but much less busy than Lincoln. If anything, it was a lot more bike-free than Lincoln. It did take about 15 minutes longer, but was very pleasant. For anyone else seeking out that route, there’s some construction along Southport south of Belmont, which eliminated the bike lane for about 1-2 blocks, but the cars and more importantly the construction workers were very generous. In fact, the workers stopped jackhammering when they saw me coming! Talk about polite! I think they are more considerate bc they have to deal with bad drivers in a different but no-less-annoying way than us cyclists.

        Still, I found myself more disappointed in the behavior of my fellow cyclists than car drivers this morning. Maybe I was being taunted by the cycling gods, but on Southport’s intersection with Lincoln I had the right of way (green light) and a cyclist on Lincoln who didn’t want to stop for his red light was edging out impatiently and almost hit me. Then, at Wells south of Walter Payton High School I almost got broadsided by a mountain biker who was riding like a kamikaze. Lastly, a bike messenger downtown came close to clipping me as I waited patiently in traffic while he threaded his narrow handle-bared bike between a cab and a commercial truck. Sigh. If cyclists want to be taken seriously in this city, we all need to pay greater attention to the basic rules of the road and common courtesy.

        • LGRAB says:

          I’m happy to hear the route worked out well for you! Good point about dealing with other cyclists. One of the benefits of side streets I haven’t mentioned is the freedom from other cyclists. I love to see lots of people on bikes and our collective presence makes cars notice us more, but on Lincoln and Wells there is waaaaay too much passing on the right, passing too closely without warning, and red light running. Annoying and unsafe.

    • LGRAB says:

      An alternate route from the north to downtown is Southport to Armitage to Wells. After Southport you have to jog east on Webster and south on Racine a bit to get to Armitage, but otherwise it’s a pretty simple route. Those three main streets all have regular striped bike lanes and are much calmer than Lincoln, although there is a lot of traffic.

      There is another, much quieter route I take with almost no traffic but there are a lot of twists and turns, I couldn’t even say which streets I take, except that I start on Greenview. I used Google Maps to find possible side streets and then spent several days of trial and error to determine the best route for me.

  45. FLF says:

    Thank you sooo much for that. I almost felt alone with our problems. I live in “paradise” here in Hawaii, and biking would sure do a lot for tourism, economy, and health, but it is slow going here. I don’t think we’re anywhere near the top 1,000 best bike cities in the U.S. “Share the road” here means bikers beware…drivers texting, burning their lips with coffee, and scolding the kids in the back seats while going 45 mph take precedence. Just got off the “Copenhagen, City of Cyclists” website…almost cried for the yearning for our cities to be like theirs.

    • LGRAB says:

      “almost cried for the yearning for our cities to be like theirs.” I know that feeling. All I can say for now is stay strong and keep riding

  46. [...] where I wanted to ride to avoid the door zone, odd bike lane designs*, and lots of potholes. Dottie wrote about this sorry bike route in August.I thought, “Doesn’t the Bike 2015 Plan address a lot of the issues present in our [...]

  47. [...] The Door Zone A bike lane in serious need of repair. Credit: Let’s Go Ride a Bike. [...]

  48. [...] The Door Zone A bike lane in serious need of repair. Credit: Let’s Go Ride a Bike. [...]

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